EP Review: The Arcadians – Fools On The Road

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The music reviews continue at Brewtown Music with a look at the upcoming EP from The Arcadians known as Fools On The Road.

The article linked above on The Arcadians dates back to 2014, but of course a lot has changed for the band since then, including a new bassist, a new studio to record in and of course, new music to release.

Bassist Oscar Carrington-Porter joined the band in 2015 and since then, the band has been getting back into their groove after Jack Lenaghan left. Let’s see if the new band addition and time spent in Slough has kept this young band strong since their 2013 debut!

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Track #1: Yes

Coming with a video released onto Youtube on March 18th 2016, people got their first taste of the EP with its lead single Yes.

Starting with a simple bass-line, high hat tapping and an echoing guitar riff, Yes gives the EP a foot-tapping indie feel that the band has evoked in their previous work, only with a more polished production behind it done by Egypt Lane Studios in Slough.

Vocally, Jamie Cavanagh continues his to use his Alex Turner-esque northern twang to great effect, immediately differentiating it from a lot of music in the Burton music scene and adding their own personality to the songs. The vocalist acts at the spokesperson for the band (the voice if you will) and let’s just say they put a good PR statement across!

Also, check out the music video above directed by Boxman Media with the boys in their all-white gear and Cavanagh chilling out in a nice little leather chair. Who could say no to that promotion?

Good introduction and an ideal lead single.

Track #2: Ruckus

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No, not THAT kind of Ruckus! This kind of Ruckus is much smaller than that, clocking in at a very short 1 minute 16 seconds! Although the more hard rock/punk feel that it gives off is a good match with a shorter length of the track.

Though it doesn’t stick around too long, Ruckus leaves an impression since Cavanagh gives us his rap-rock stylings in this track which suits his vocal style very well and although it’s no Psyko Dalekhe gives us more aggression than we usually see from the band.

A short description for a short, but serviceable track.

Track #3: Lovers Apart

A more troubled romantic song graces number 3 on the EP, telling the story of a man trying to get a hold on his long distance relationship.

Cos we’re two lovers apart and the cities they are changing

As time took control.

Cos we’re two lovers apart in cities with strange ways.

The lovers in the song are distanced not only by literal distance, but also in personality and the fact that the man in the scenario has a busy life that keeps him from spending as much time with his partner as he could.

The song starts off with a gentle guitar riff but soon picks up the pace with almost a jolly and brisk pace that is, shall we say, poles apart from the subject matter. Juxtapositions never heard to have around in any form of media so let’s have one in for our love song on the EP!

A frustrated love song that gives the album a tragic slant!

Track #4: Change In The Tide

A drum roll and striking chords lead us into our penultimate track, that appears to be about a person who can’t face the circumstances of change amongst her social group whether it be a personal attitude change or a change of surroundings for where they usually meet (Is it under your skin, is it really your thing? A dirty disco with an 80s theme)

Both the person being addressed and not the singer addressing have this feeling due to the addressee’s attitude getting under the singer’s skin for not having a good night out with him and the party.

The song is punched with HEYs and AHOYs give the song a bizarre pirate-like quality that doesn’t seem to fit with the message of the song, although the song is called Change in the TIDE (Tide, sea, pirates, best I can do!) and it’s memorable so you have to give that to them!

A song for one of those awkward, unsocial nights out.

Track #5: Nightmare In London

The EP ends on a sinister note with the song Nightmare In London which takes the night out from the awkward yet still fun tone of Change in The Tide to the almost dire and hopeless feel this ending track gives off.

With the almost metallic chords, cowbell tolling and creeping keyboard riff, the untoward feeling pervades the song from the offset and continues with the words of abandonment and loneliness the singer feels in the early hours of a night out in London:

Lost friends, 4am, what a horrid situation, where could they be?

I was so scared, they were taken by the alien population!

Cos this is another world to me!

Could be worse! Perhaps eated by a looming wolf in London!

Sounds like the desperate drunk ramblings of a London town night to me, or a guy who’s watched too many John Landis movies! Whether the monster turns out to be a backpacking American or not remains to be seen.

The vulnerability of not only being out of your head, but also out of your element is clear here and ends the EP on quite a dour note despite apart from the scary intro and minor key, retains the up tempo energy from the other songs on the release.

Not one to listen to when stumbling out of the club without your friends on your big weekend away, but definitely one to listen to out of enjoyment nontheless!

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Preferably in the most philosophically looking way possible!

Despite a slight line-up change, The Arcadians continue to put out good content with this EP being a summary of such. The energy stays in each song no matter what the subject matter and it one to prepare you for the influx of indie tunes you’ll no doubt be listening to in the wake of the year’s festival season.

Fools On The Road will be released on 27th March at the launch gig in Burton Market Hall which also features upcoming Burton-based singer-songwriter LAYKES (Kyle Munsie from Between Kites), punk group The Mammoths and Midlands favourites Star From Ivy.

Until the next brew served, see you next time!

One response to “EP Review: The Arcadians – Fools On The Road

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